Trip 3: Hudson River, Albany to Rhinecliff, October 1999

Text and Photos by Vladimir Brezina

View of the Catskills

Saturday, 2 October
7:10 a.m. Amtrak train to Albany, then taxi to boat launch in Corning Preserve just north of railroad bridge. Launched  just before 11 a.m.

Sunny with some high clouds, still reasonably warm. Favorable ebb current through the afternoon, but persistent head wind from the south, at first only 10 knots, but increasing to 15-20 knots at times. Chop increasing in places to 1-1.5 feet, with whitecaps. Water distinctly cool now: brief initial shock on stepping into it.

The route: Albany to Rhinebeck

Foliage colorful now along this section of the river. (From the train could see that it is still predominantly green further south.) Even here still not quite at its peak. In few places a riot of yellows, oranges, and reds (hanging vines, especially, provide bright red accents). Mostly, however, more subtle—one flame-orange branch or tree among shades of green.

Paddled south past Papscanee Island (lunch opposite), then Campbell Island, Schodack Island, Houghtaling Island, Bronck Island (looked for HRWA campground, but couldn’t identify it), Rattlesnake Island, Coxsackie Island. Then crossed to Nutten Hook (here wind gusts up to 20-25 knots, many whitecaps, although waves relatively small), past Gays Point (deluxe campground with dock, grass, water (?) occupied) down to campground at northern tip of Stockport Middle Ground. Nobody there. Campground has picnic tables, barbecues, fire pits, two outhouses. (Picnic tables and barbecues also in a number of the bays of the beach just north, on Gays Point. This area has quite a number of comfortable camping possibilities.) Beautiful views north up to Coxsackie Island, west across the river (arrived at 5:30 p.m., an hour before sunset, so could sit at picnic table and eat dinner while watching the sun set) as well as east, for sunrise.

View from Stockport

Quite warm until sunset, then cooling. But still warm enough in old sleeping bag (with sweatshirt, long pants and socks, thought).

Sunday, 3 October

Some sun visible at sunrise, then clouds moving in and becoming overcast. Light north wind starting up. Left around 9 a.m. Still strong flood current against, so kept to shore of Stockport Middle Ground, then crossed to western shore of river. Started to rain; light to moderate showers for the next couple of hours. But foliage more deeply colorful against the gray.

Took some pictures, but with this camera will probably come out flat without direct sun. Paddled down the western branch of the river past Athens and the lighthouse south of Middle Ground Flats. Overtook group of kayakers out of Hudson going to the marshes south of Catskill. Current now turning to ebb and north wind increasing; making good progress. Becoming sunny again.

Fall colors

Past Catskill to mouth of Roeliff Jansen Kill (lunch around 12 noon), then down main channel to Saugerties (second lunch, 2 p.m.). In shallows and flats along the eastern shore of the river over the several miles before Saugerties, many duck blinds; heard occasional shots. Second lunch on Cruger Island (2:30 p.m.) then down main, western channel and finally east again to Rhinecliff (4:30 p.m.) Amtrak train back to New York City.

Total distance paddled 46+ nm, about 14 hours.

(Note: It’s reassuring to read about Vlad’s pauses for lunch and “second lunch”. Years later he became famous for his ability and desire to spend extended hours in his boat without stopping (20 or more, in some cases). But it’s good to know he didn’t start out that way!

That “second lunch” will also bring a smile to the face of anyone who knew Vlad’s legendary delight in eating. I’ve never known anyone with such an uncomplicated love of food. He wasn’t a food snob. He enjoyed everything from the finest aged steak to McDonald’s hamburgers, but with a definite preference for whole, natural foods.  Perfectly ripe fresh pears and peaches, ice cold from the fridge, were a particular favorite. He ate everything with gusto, eyes sparkling: “This is soooo good!” he would exclaim. )

13 responses to “Trip 3: Hudson River, Albany to Rhinecliff, October 1999

  1. It’s so nice to read the narrative and admire those stunning images. Through you, he lives on.

    Beautiful and so peaceful…

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks, Johna. I needed that.
    George

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Did you rent kayaks up there or you got them on the train. I take my bicycle on the train, but didn’t think of the kayak.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. My first husband and I used to travel to Rhinecliff. They had a revolutionary era inn that had been a carriage house where they served roasted venison. You brought up so many memories.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Such a long haul! All that time on the train, so early in the morning, and then on down the river…but obviously it was worth it. The photo of the view from Stockton is simply stunning, and reminiscent of both Hudson R. School and earlier European paintings.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Johna Till Johnson

      :-) Actually I think all that effort was the high point of Vlad’s week. There’s an upcoming post where he mentions that watching the sun rise while putting his boat together was “worth the $31 Amtrak ticket”–and by extension, all the rest of the fuss and bother.

      He lived for those “peak moments” of life—that moment when you watch a bird soar, or see the rising sun touch the clouds with pink, and your soul is perfectly at peace.

      Thanks for reading, and posting!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. This is where we often paddle. Thanks for the trip.

    Liked by 1 person

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