L’Hermione

By Vladimir Brezina

L'Hermione at the South Street Seaport, NYC

The Hermione was a French frigate that, most famously, in 1780 carried the Marquis de Lafayette to America with news of French help for the American Revolution. The Hermione was then a brand-new ship, having been built in Rochefort, France, in 1779. She survived only another few years, being wrecked in 1793.

L'Hermione under sailBut now there is Hermione 2.0! A full-scale replica, she was built again in Rochefort and launched in 2014. Earlier this summer, she sailed across the Atlantic for a tour of the major US ports of Franco-American historical significance.

We went to see her when she arrived in New York City.

Here is a selection of photos from that visit (click on any photo to start slideshow):

And here are more photos of L’Hermione’s visit to NYC by tugster.

23 responses to “L’Hermione

  1. Magnifique! (Sp?) Oh, you guys MUST go see that new rap musical, “Hamilton.” Mr. Lafayette didn’t come off so well, LOL… a bit late to the party. You will love it!!!! Thx for a great post. See you soon!!!! J&A

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  2. Way cool. Haven’t been aboard one of those old sailing ships in 20 years. Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. She is definitely a masterpiece.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. We were up in Maine when they stopped there. It is always impressive to see tall ships. :-)

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Goodness! That must have taken some building!

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  6. Great photos – what an experience!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Fantastic pictures: thanks for sharing. What I also discovered – I hadn’t known that before – is that one of the famous “Flying P Liners”, The “Peking” is docked in NY harbour as a museum ship. Now that’s another itiem on my bucket list.
    Have a great day,
    Pit

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  8. Oh the ropes! I could easily get them tangled!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Love those old ships – they’re breathtaking on the water.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Thanks for the info and the video: ever so interesting. I’m sorry to hear about the possible fate of the Peking. :( I’m not quite sure, but I believe there’s only one other surviving, the Passat, in Travemuende, Germany. And they have problems financing the upkeep, too.
    Have a great day,
    Pit

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    • According to Wikipedia, there are four Flying P-Liners still in existence:

      The Pommern is a museum ship in Mariehamn, Finland.
      The Peking is a museum ship in New York City (South Street Seaport).
      The Passat is a museum ship in Lübeck’s sea resort Travemünde, Germany.
      The Padua is the only ship still active: she is today a school ship and sails as the Kruzenshtern under Russian flag.

      Many more are now gone.

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  11. Thanks so much for the info. I should at least have known about the Kruzenstern. We jokingly called her “Dieselstern” because, miraculously ;) she could move in the tall ship races when all the other windjammers were stuck in a fog with no wind.
    Have a great time,
    Pit

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    • Even the Hermione 2.0 has an engine (well hidden). I was wondering how she could keep such a tight schedule up the East Coast if she was sometimes obliged to wait maybe for days for favorable wind to enter port, as Hermione 1.0 would have done in the 18th century, but apparently ships are beyond that now :-)

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      • Well, there’s nothing against an auxiliary engine, isn’t it? In my long-bygone sailing days I was always happy to have one – just in case.
        Have a great weekend,
        Pit

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  12. Made a flashing visit to NYC yesterday. I think we saw her, too. Not as closely as you. :-) Great pictures.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Pingback: Left Over Articles (9-17-2015) | My Daily Musing

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