Paddle to Long Island Sound

By Vladimir Brezina

Last weekend, the currents took us on another of our favorite paddles—from Pier 40 in Manhattan round the Battery, up the East River, through Hell Gate, and round Throgs Neck into Long Island Sound.

Rounding Throgs Neck is like entering another world. The towers of Manhattan are still visible—all this is still within the borders of New York City!—but they are tiny in the distance. The broad blue Sound opens up. Shoals of white sailboats cruise past. Rocks are crowded with cormorants. We paddle past lighthouses and round islands—City Island, Hart Island, Pea Island…

Here are a few photos (click on any photo to start slideshow).

More photos are here.

36 responses to “Paddle to Long Island Sound

  1. Pingback: Travel Theme: Architecture | Wind Against Current

  2. Fantastic, Vladimir!!!
    Pedro.

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  3. Wonderful tour, Vladimir!

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  4. Great photos!! Thanks for sharing! http://holley4734.wordpress.com/

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  5. Ohh, these photos are stunning! I really like the last one “the last look”. We went to New York City a few years ago, and we had a great time! One of my favorite memories of being there was going on the Circle Line tour (is that what it’s called?) Whatever it was called, it was a lot of fun, and we thoroughly enjoyed it! What a great city!

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  6. Ya know, we’ve never paddled close to Stepping Stones light! Thanks for showing it to us :) Recently heard that Pea (aka, Pee) Island is for sale.

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  7. Großartige Fotos!!!

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  8. Thanks for taking us long! Wow!

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  9. Love the red and green, siesta, sun shots…
    Too many to name. Excellent fun!

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  10. I can’t remember ever going on such a wonderful ride on the river. Your photos have transported me to a very wonderful place with stunning. Thanks for sharing. Going back to NYC with all grandchildren soon.

    BE ENCOURAGED! BE BLESSED!

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  11. thank you for the tour vlad.. i really enjoyed it :)

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  12. Excellent photography and all from the cockpit of a kayak , quite a skill . I particularly like the photo while heading back of the Brooklyn bridge with the reflection of the sun bouncing off the water and then off the underside of the bridge .

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    • Thanks, Stephen!

      A lot of the skill has to do with the need to race around my kayak model to get the best angle for the shot as she cruises, obliviously, at five knots or whatever it is these days ;-)

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  13. Can’t tell you how much I love going along with you two on your paddling adventures! It makes me happy to see what you see – and at the level you get to see things.

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  14. The location of NYC Potter’s Field was unknown — thanks for filling in my back pages! Hart Island a grim place indeed.
    Also nice to see a close-up of Stepping Stones Light, a shame in such bad condition. Its near twin, Hudson–Athens Lighthouse, very spruce these days. Saturday looked like an open house, people all over, even on the veranda-like ledge that surrounds the light.
    Google’s aerial shows a small island just west of Pea that has a large concrete structure, basically a stack of boxes, looks abandoned. Not finding it among the photos — possibly anonymous, not named even on the NOAA chart. Did you see it?

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    • This book provides a lot of detailed history on all the islands of New York City, including Hart Island and its Potter’s Field…

      Stepping Stones Light is a bit worn on the outside, but still operates as a lighthouse. Apparently it’s under consideration for sale, following many others.

      The strange island you found on Google Maps (or Earth—aren’t those satellite views wonderful for that kind of thing?) is Columbia Island. It’s hard to miss when paddling in those waters! The concrete slab on the island was built by CBS as the foundation for the transmitter tower of their WABC radio station. The transmitter operated until 1963 when it was transferred to High Island, adjacent to City Island, where the transmitter tower still is (and where it’s had an interesting history too! ;-)).

      Columbia Island was unoccupied for some years, but now some very interesting things are going on there. A recent article is here.

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  15. Vlad,
    Jeanie and I are headed down on the 24th to circ Manhattan the 25th. Thanks to you, Johna and your posts it won’t be our only canoe visit to the area. This post is another wonderful “invitation”. Does the NYC tourist bureau pay you for your spectacular promotions? Ha!

    George

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    • We’ll cite you as a reference when we apply to them for funding! Thanks, George!

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      • A big thumbs up from me! I am amazed at the amount of paddle sport in and around the city. I lost sight of the NYC area when I moved to Maine, almost 40 years ago. Your documentation of it is remarkable. Thanks so much.
        G

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        • There’s much more paddle sport around NYC now than there was 40 years ago—even 20 years ago! Not everyone covers the whole city like we do, but everywhere you look in the summer, there are kayaks, SUPs, rowboats, dragon boats, and even a few canoes ;-)

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  16. this is awesome! thanks for the ride!!! keep paddling!

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  17. vastlycurious.com

    WOW!!!

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